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Manga has gained popularity on campus

Henry Bedoya and Esteban De La Torre

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Time can change many things; one such thing is senior’s Nicholas Salazar’s perspective on manga. Previously he believed that manga was “for nerds who didn’t know how to get girls.”

But it wasn’t long before Nicholas immersed himself in manga and its culture, which he came to enjoy. While looking back on his past self, he believed himself, “ignorant and blinded by stereotypes.”
Manga is Japanese style comic books. Recently the school library obtained several mangas. Though some people may misunderstand manga, its popularity with NSSH students is proven; with students checking out manga books almost daily.

Though manga and anime may be becoming a bit more mainstream it is still often viewed as being for kids when in reality, “anime (and manga) almost never has been for kids; anime became for kids,” said Mr. Derrickson, the Comic Book Club adviser and English III teacher.

Anime is the animation of manga and what you watch on television or the Internet, though it does not always have to be based on a manga. Mr. Derrickson said, “It was considered to be very nerdy, to be into comic books, anime and manga were not even a thing to be honest…but something happened around the year 2000 or so that all of a sudden it became cool to like superheroes and manga. I think people still like to say that it’s nerd stuff but that word has changed so much over the years that it doesn’t even mean anything; people wear the term nerd as a badge.”

Even though there is some bias against manga it has continued to bring people together regardless of how people interact with society.

“There are people who are fans of this that experience crippling shyness, and anxiety, social anxiety, and introversion and even conditions like autism. It gives us all a common ground to stand on,” said Mr. Derrickson.

This serves as an example of how people can bond over common interests such as manga and anime.
“It unites people among all backgrounds, races, conditions, socioeconomic status and its provided a place where we can kind of escape reality and fantasize about being powerful, which is really what everyone wants deep down inside,” Mr. Derrickson said.

Though manga can be seen as something that one might enjoy every once in awhile, it is actually more than that; it is something for people to share and find identity within.

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Manga has gained popularity on campus